We Labour, We Labour , We Labour [To Protect Ourselves From The Horrible Sounds of Our Horrible Culture, We Should Return These Stones To The Earth]

We Labour (3 of 36)We Labour (5 of 36)We Labour (11 of 36)We Labour (12 of 36)We Labour (13 of 36)We Labour (16 of 36)We Labour (17 of 36)We Labour (18 of 36)We Labour (19 of 36)We Labour (21 of 36)We Labour (22 of 36)We Labour (23 of 36)We Labour (24 of 36)We Labour (25 of 36)We Labour (26 of 36)We Labour (27 of 36)We Labour (28 of 36)We Labour (29 of 36)We Labour (30 of 36)We Labour (32 of 36)We Labour (34 of 36)We Labour (35 of 36)We Labour (36 of 36)

Eight concrete forms are linked together by eight pairs of headphones. All are joined to the same amplifier by garishly coloured cables. The headphones having been set into the wet cement, have become inseparable from the forms. They play a soundtrack to an animation; a version of Joseph Gandys watercolour of a ruinous Bank of England. The audio is a collection of field recordings, ranging from seismic rumbling to domestic and industrial machinery. The headphones channel the sounds, excluding all others and sending waves into the concrete forms. Microscopicaly reshaping them, recording the sound anew. Solidifying the noise. Permanently archiving the intonations of a culture that headphones would normally work to exclude [blocking the din of contemporary life, an audial opiate for the masses]. Would burying these concrete forms below ground preserve their records?

with Audio from John Hughes, Adam Laschinger, The London Sound Survey, Anne Robinson and Samantha Taylor.

Advertisements